LifeCycle Challenge

 
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Days 7 & 8: Nearer the Finishline

The past two days of the Foster Clark’s LifeCycle Challenge have proven that even though they near the end of their epic journey, the cyclists cannot let their guard down. In total the cyclists have traversed 394km through Tanzania in the past two days alone, 193km yesterday and 201km today.

Yesterdays ride, the seventh day on the bike, started early as usual after a nights camp at the snake park. The challenge now took on a new face, besides keeping the physical intensity. Cyclists were now riding on a long straight road that undulated up and down for hours on end, testing their physical and mental endurance. The long tarmac road was broken by hazardous, busy roadworks at random intervals with lorries rushing past in their normal fashion blasting our cyclists with dust. As they went on their way curious onlookers kept them company with interested stares and smiles, entertained at the fact that 12 people had come to Tanzania to subject themselves to such physical strain. The audience re-convened as the cyclists rode in to their home for the night, a camp  in a schoolyard with minimal amenities and after a seriously long day they prepared themselves for an even longer ride the following.

On both days Tanzania proved to be a country full of police checks, so regular that the Back-Up crew found it difficult at times to keep up with the cyclists. Being so high up in altitude  the team has been subjected to freezing temperatures at the start of the day and searing temperatures at midday, made worse by the black tarmac radiating heat angrily at the cyclists.

This mornings ride was accompanied by an eerie fog, making emotions rather tense. By this point we were all aware that driving in Tanzania was less then ideal and having poor vision (we couldn’t see more then 5m in front of us) did not make matters any better. As the back-up team did their best to escort cyclists through there was a sigh of relief as all emerged unscathed, albeit with numb hands and toes.

After all the miles the cyclists have done injuries such as saddle-sores and others best left unmentioned are requiring constant attention and becoming more and more difficult to deal with. Never the less the cyclists bravely trudged on the tarmac road which is now at long last descending (over-all) to the coast and our final destination. The difficulty with an undulating road is that on the bike the descent can be difficult to notice as the overall reduction in altitude is still accompanied by some tough climbs.

Now only two long days away from their destination the cyclists are determined to get to their end-point and despite being visibly exhausted nothing seems to be able to stand in their way. Tonight the brave heroes have a break from the camping and are enjoying at least a warm shower in the modest lodge they call home for the night. Tomorrows ride will take cyclists as far as they can go and is expected to begin as early as 0600hrs. We are so proud of what the cyclists have achieved and will continue to achieve in aid of renal research and patients and hope that their efforts inspire more to help with this worthy cause.

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