LifeCycle Challenge

 
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Day 7: The Desert Never Ends

There may only be four days of cycling left, but every day left now is over 200km long meaning cyclists will get no break from long arduous journeys in the extreme heat. Today’s cycle will take them a further 224km along the coast. They cyclists climbed out of their tents at around 03:30 a.m to take on another day of desert roads.

It has often been said that an endurance challenge of this standard is about both physical and mental endurance. Spending an average of 11 hours on a bike a day will take a toll physically, with blisters, sores and bruises. However it also takes a strong mentality to be able to do this challenge. Both to keep going despite the intense heat but also because of the long hours staring at a similar landscape. On days when cyclists have nothing to look at during their ride but a desert landscape, their mental state is just as important a factor in getting them to the finish line as their physical fitness level.

As a Foundation we raise awareness on renal disease and have often spoken about the trials patients are put through when on dialysis or receiving a donor kidney. Our founder Alan Curry has also often compared the physical challenges cyclists face as a way of showing support to patients. The psychological aspect of the challenge just mentioned is an important reminder of the psychological trauma and difficulties kidney patients must go through when handling the disease.

As the cyclists approached their campsite they will be keeping focused on the goal, the finish line on day ten. By this point the cyclists have been put through massive mental and physical challenges and often all one can do to keep pedalling is to think about crossing that finish line. The end of the day came over 11 hours from when cyclists began their day. With three days of cycling left after today, morale is high as these athletes begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel!

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